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A Belated January Report

Posted by BrianW on February 19, 2014 at 3:20 PM Comments comments (0)

For January, the club took part in the India-Pakistan War of 1965, thanks to the Crisis in Kashmir! scenario book for CY6JA, and my airplanes. The scenario was entitled, “Breaking the Sabre,” and recreated a fighter sweep by Folland Gnats of the Indian Air Force (IAF) against missile carrying F-86 Sabres and F-104 Starfighters of the Pakistan Air Force (PAF).


 


At the beginning of the scenario, things looked pretty grim for the PAF. With only two Sabres on the board, they were facing a total of seven Gnats. To make things worse, the PAF players were sandwiched between the three Gnats they were ambushing and the four Gnats that were ambushing them! While the PAF could expect reinforcements in the form of a single F-104 later in the game, it looked like that might be a long time in coming. The IAF did not have everything its own way, however. The Folland Gnat suffered from problems with its guns, maneuverability at high speeds, a short amount of time to spend on the board and poor visibility. Or, in the words of one CY6 Jet Age player, “the Gnat’s a piece of junk, but it’s a fun piece of junk.”




The game turned into a twisting furball almost immediately, and any idea of aircraft staying in pairs for maneuver went right out the window. Even though the PAF Sabres had Sidewinder missiles, none were fired during the game. There were a number of reasons for this; the range was too close, the Sabres were busy doing special maneuvers and the IAF pilots seemed to delight in making head-to-head attack runs. The power of 6 x .50 caliber HMGs would not be denied though, and the IAF lost two Gnats. The PAF pilots seemed to be extraordinarily lucky, especially when one Sabre was attacked by three Gnats, and none of them hit. Numbers would tell though, and by the time the PAF Starfighter arrived, one of the Sabres had been damaged. Although designed as an interceptor rather than a dogfighter, even the Starfighter managed to get a gun kill on a Gnat during the battle. It still wasn’t enough though, and at the end of the game there were three IAF Gnats shot down, but both of the Sabres were shot down as well, with none of the PAF pilots surviving. That, along with the remaining Gnats returning safely to base, was enough to give the IAF a razor-thin victory. The final score was 14 IAF victory points to 13 PAF victory points.



 

Attention to Orders

Posted by Rob on June 2, 2013 at 3:55 PM Comments comments (1)

ATTENTION TO ORDERS: THE PRIME MINISTER OF ISRAEL, ACTING UPON THE RECOMMENDATION OF THE MINISTER OF DEFENSE, HAS PLACED SPECIAL TRUST AND CONFIDENCE IN THE PATRIOTISM, INTEGRITY, AND ABILITIES OF LIEUTENANT FIRST CLASS REUVAN ROZEN.  IN VIEW OF THESE SPECIAL QUALITIES, AND HIS DEMONSTRATED POTENTIAL TO SERVE IN THE HIGHER GRADE, LIEUTENANT FIRST CLASS ROZEN IS PROMOTED TO THE GRADE OF CAPTAIN, ISRAELI AIR FORCE, EFFECTIVE THE 8TH DAY OF JUNE, NINETEEN HUNDRED SIXTY-SEVEN, BY ORDER OF THE COMMANDER IAF.

As I heard these words, I thought back on the mission that I had narrowly survived.  What a cluster...  There were 8 of us that went in.  It was supposed to be a 'milk run' to hit some of the Egytian troops near Refidim.  This was the third day of Operation Moked and we were winning!  What happened?  I never saw such good flying by the Egyptians.

Everything was going fine. Giora said this would be a great day to get some more kills.  Oh Giora, what happend?  It must have been the shrapnel wound he had only two days ago.  Made him a little crazy.  The Commanders loved him, we all loved him.  A true natural pilot and oh how he could fly.

105 Squadron's Super Mystere's went in first, dropped their bombs and got some hits.  One of the Super Mysteres got dropped by some AAA right away.  That should have told us this was not going to be our day.  Then some MiGs popped up, perfectly bracketing 105 Squadron to the front and rear.  One of the 105 squadron pilots shouted out that he recognized them as the newer MiG-19 types right before he fire-balled from a deflection shot.  No chute.

Giora led our section of Mirages into a power dive to assist our attack pilot brothers.  He said to ignore the ground targets and to get some MiGs roundels painted onto our aircraft.  Oh he was so confident yesterday.  I pulled in behind him and was shocked when suddenly, a fireball from his aircraft and then he was gone....  The MiG that got Giora immediately fireballed too when Giora's wingman took him out with a savage scream over the radio.  We were all stunned at that point.

But there were still MiGs all over, and the Super Mysteres were running for home with MiG calls cluttering the radio.  One by one I saw the rest of 105 Squadron go down.  Avi and I pulled Immelmans over the top of Giora's smoking grave and ran for home using all our afterburners and diving to the deck.  Two MiG-17s came after us with similar moves and took shots until they probably ran out of ammunition.  I was upset that we were running but silently agreed with Avi this was the time to egress and fight another day.  Avi did not make it.  The MiGs choose to concentrate on him.  No chute.  I mourn for you Avraham. Why you and not me?  Giora...  105 Squadron friends...  As the triple silver Captain bars are pinned on, I wonder what is the next mission for me?  Will I meet those same Egyptians the next time up?  Who were they?  How were they so well trained?

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We had a great crowd out last month for a continuation of the Six Day War mini-campaign from the CY6 book Star and Pyramid.  Nine pilots took to the skies and Andy's buddy, Andrew, took some amazing photos with the best lighting equipment and camera we have ever seen.  All pilots quickly mastered the mechanics and we got down to it.  Scenario was Giora's Shahak from the S&P book.  It's a cool scenario, basically an egress game with the attack pilots dropping bombs on Turn 1 and then trying to escape with escort fighters coming in to help.  I doubled the ground targets, defenses, attack, escort, and intercepting pilots as we basically had twice the number of players as the original scenario calls for.  AAA fire was incredibly accurate, getting a quick kill, and then started shooting solely at Egyptian aircraft but luckly for them missing from then on.  The MiG dice were hot as witnessed by a green MiG-19 flaming veteran Giora Ram in a head-to-head shot.  If you play this game enough you will eventually see almost anything possible happen.  Unfortunately the victorous Egyptian MiG pilot did not live to celebrate his kill. 

Score of the game was 44-8 in Egypt's favor, mainly due to the high points for aircraft kills (Giora's alone was worth 12 points).  Current campaign score after 4 games is 74-31 in Egypts favor again.  This Six Day War may have a shorter duration. 

Another bonus discovery during our game is that Steven H. has an amazing painted aircraft collection.  He said his best paintbrush is his credit card!  We decided to try Yom Kippur War or Iran/Iraq in our next Jets outing with his aircraft to move the weapons technology forward and try out some radar missiles and ECM.

Looking forward to the next modern-Africa outing in the Wubaqi Chronicles later in June.